Day 30 – Moving on in Prayer

Then David got up from the ground. After he had washed, put on lotions and changed his clothes, he went into the house of the Lord and worshiped. Then he went to his own house, and at his request they served him food, and he ate. (2 Samuel 12:20)

Over the course of the last few devotions we’ve talked about being persistent in prayer and praying selflessly for others. Today, we are going to talk about a much more difficult topic: moving on in prayer. In today’s focal Scripture we see David, the same David the Scripture describes as a “man after God’s own heart” (Acts 13:22), getting up after God had answered a desperate plea. David’s son with Bathsheba (the wife of Uriah with whom David had an affair) had died. David had desperately prayed for his newborn son that God might spare his child and let him live, God’s answer came through David’s son’s death.

As the father of a child who has gone on to be with the Lord, I can tell you that the death of a child almost destroyed me. Losing Brynleigh Grace was the hardest thing I’ve ever had to endure. It is by the grace of God alone (the grace that she got her middle name from) that sustained me through her death. Unlike David, I didn’t have the opportunity to pray for her as she suffered in the pangs of death. As I look at David’s response as his son died, I am astonished at his faith and the faith filled actions.

If you go to 2 Samuel chapter 12 and read, you’ll find that the servants and those around David were almost perplexed by his response. The King had been praying, fasting, weeping for his son while his son fought for his life. He pleaded with God for mercy for his child and God said no. After the death of his son, David finished his prayer and fasting and he moved on. Don’t misunderstand what I’m getting ready to say, I am confident that David loved his child and losing the child was incredibly painful. But, David had learned what you and I need to learn: when God gives an answer for our prayer, it’s time to move on.

I almost moved on from this devotion without capturing one of the most stunning response we see from David who had just been pouring out his desperation for his child’s life before God. After God did not spare his son, David entered into the ‘house of the Lord’ and worshiped God! I can frankly and honestly say that my immediate response was not David’s response. After the death of my daughter I struggled for weeks, months, and years with her death. Know this: God has been faithfully patient, loving, and tender to me through every moment.

The truths of God’s Word are so precious and important for us to understand. I’ve called this out in our earlier devotions but the entire childish thought that God “never says no” is a spiritually immature perspective that won’t withstand reality. God does say no. When God says no, we could spend time pleading and beginning like a child who wants dessert or a toy at the store or we could trust Him even when the answer is difficult to accept.

As I sit here writing this devotion, I know what I’m sharing is difficult but I believe this is a Christ honoring way to pray. When God’s answer is “no”, instead of begging for Him to change His mind, how different would our lives be if we prayed for Him to give us grace to walk through that no. How different would it be if we asked for faith to trust Him. How different would it be if we prayed “Thy will be done”, and truly meant it? How different would our lives be if we not only knew that God is using all things for good (Romans 8:28), but that we trusted it?

As you prepare to pray today, remember that God is using all things for good. That doesn’t mean all things are good… it doesn’t mean they feel good or that the things themselves are even good, it means that God is using all things (even our most desperate pain and suffering) for good. As the Master Weaver of time, He is meticulously weaving every moment of time to work out His perfect will for creation. Ask yourself today: when has God’s reply been no? How did that affect your pray life? Is there some doubt or fear that God may say no again? If so, start today by confessing any struggle or doubt. Then trust Him, even in the “no”.

Father, today we confess Lord that as your children it’s hard to hear you say no. Lord, I confess the spiritual memory of some painful no answers to my prayers. Lord we know that you aren’t some cosmic genie who answers our every beckon and call. You are our Good Father and You know what we need, when we need it, and how we need it. Lord just as David did, teach us to move on with our lives when Your answer to our prayer is no. Teach is that we can trust you through every answered prayer, even when the answer isn’t what we hoped for or longed for. Sustain us in the midst of our pain and fear. In Jesus’ name we pray, amen.

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